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Learning to do you own appliance repair can save you money in two ways. You save money by not having to pay the $50 to $75 an hour labor rate that most service technicians charge, with a one hour minimum. In some case, you will even save big bucks on parts. For example, today's major appliances use a lot of electronic circuitry mounted on PC (Printed Circuit) boards. The problem with that is that service technicians do not repair those boards, they replace them. The problem with that is that a m...
Published by Jerry Walch 71 months ago in Appliance Repair | +7 votes | 3 comments
I really do not know why it is, but it seems like every time someone calls me because their clothes dryer is not producing any heat, it turns out to be either a burned out heating element or a burned out thermal fuse. Most of the people who I know in the appliance repair business tell me they are experiencing the same thing. There was a time when there was just as good a chance that it would be a high-limit thermostat, a temperature selector switch, or even a bad contact on the timer. Today it i...
Published by Jerry Walch 71 months ago in Appliance Repair | +7 votes | 2 comments
There are two different types of capacitors associated with electric motors—motor starting capacitors and motor running capacitors. Motor Start Capacitors and Motor Run capacitors are not the same type of capacitors. Motor Start capacitors are Dry Electrolytic Capacitors and Motor Run Capacitors are Oil Filled Capacitors. They serve different purposes in the circuit and cannot be used interchangeably. Testing Motor Start Capacitors will not be covered in this article.
Published by Jerry Walch 71 months ago in Appliance Repair | +3 votes | 1 comments
Modern appliances are different from those of yesteryear in that they incorporate many electrical and electronic components that were once found only in radios and televisions. Microwave ovens, for example need voltages both higher and lower than the 110-Volts supplied by the wall receptacle that they plug into. These different voltage are provided by transformers, electrical devices that step-up or step-down the 110-Volt line voltage.
Published by Jerry Walch 71 months ago in Appliance Repair | +8 votes | 6 comments